Shining Tea Room

Beliefs

This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Clare Trent Clare Trent 3 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #1428885
    Profile photo of Cordelia Flyte
    Cordelia
    Participant

    Rayati!

    I’ve not seen such a general discussion of religious beliefs on here, but I’d be interested in one. So it would be lovely to know, especially if you’re a déanist, what groups you associate with and what you believe in, if that’s all right~

  • #1430034
    Profile photo of Petite Sorcière
    Petite Sorcière
    Participant

    “Belief” is a curious idea isn’t it? I mean, in relation to “religion”. In Christianity it has tended to mean “I believe this to be true because I believe all other religions to be false”. I think it would be curious if what one “believed” happened to be the “only truth”.

    So I guess I believe that there is a fundamental Truth that is beyond the possibility of comprehensively expressing in words but to which words and narratives can point and traditionally have done so.

    Possibly Buddhism gives the most accessible path to that fundamental truth.

    I can’t say I have any experience with groups of any kind. I do find groups of West Tellurian people kind of strange and off-putting. They have – well just such an odd way of saying and doing anything.

    But maybe that’s just me.

  • #1430132
    Profile photo of Cordelia Flyte
    Cordelia
    Participant

    You make a very good point, Petite Sorcière! It’s human egotism to expect to be able to understand the universal truth- surely something that all-consuming would be utterly incomprehensible. May I ask why you find Buddhism closest to it, tho?

  • #1430181
    Profile photo of Petite Sorcière
    Petite Sorcière
    Participant

    I said most accessible rather than closest, which is a slightly different thing.

    In a way I think the Vedanta expresses Truth more “explicitly” (an absurd term since “explicitness” is precisely what isn’t possible – the Tao that can be spoken is not the true Tao) but whether Vedic-based “religion” is possible to people outside the Indian caste structure is a very moot point. I know modernists (Indian and Occidental) take no notice of considerations like this, but I am not at all convinced they know what they are talking about. I suspect that if they did they wouldn’t be modernists.

    Buddhism, to a certain extent universalized the Vedanta and made it accessible outside its homeland (Christianity and Islam did the same with Judaism). So I suppose that I am really only speaking in a personal way here, in that Christianity and Islam are not really something I could adhere to.

    The idea that any being could be lost forever is something I really can’t believe. I think probably it is just a way of expressing the idea of the urgency of human life which Buddhism does by stressing how human life is extremely hard to obtain.

    However the belief that every being derives from the One and must therefore return to the One eventually seems fundamental to me. And the fact that all beings have Buddha-nature seems to me like another way of expressing this.

  • #1433051
    Profile photo of Cordelia Flyte
    Cordelia
    Participant

    Ah, I see what you mean! Thank you for explaining~ I also agree that there is something off about modernists taking a living religion from its societal roots and context, but does anyone have any thoughts about reconstructionist religions based on the palaeolithic goddess cults? I’ve just found it interesting how in so many myths, especially Greek ones, the overthrow of the Earth Goddess by aggressive young gods is so explicitly shown. Going back to one’s religious roots, if possible, has a certain appeal.

  • #1433467
    Profile photo of Petite Sorcière
    Petite Sorcière
    Participant

    I think reconstructions of non-living religions is dubious at the best of times not least because most rely on some kind of initiatic succession which no longer exists.

    However in the case of palaeolithic religions, the term “reconstruction” is completely inapplicable. Since no one knows anything about these religions beyond the statues there is nothing to reconstruct. The correct word is “invention”. And the inventions always look extremely like 21st-century Western thinking.

  • #1433469
    Profile photo of Sushuri
    Sushuri
    Moderator

    That is true, isn’t it? But I think we can say that we have a Mother who loves us.

  • #1433559
    Profile photo of Cordelia Flyte
    Cordelia
    Participant

    I very much agree with both of you, which is stopping me from ascribing to any current creed at present. Yet how then do we seek this mother who loves us?

  • #1436126
    Profile photo of Sanae
    Sanae
    Participant

    Honored Miss Flyte, I can only speak to my own experience, and I am far from a knowledgable maid about these things, but perhaps what I have perceived will be helpful to you.

    You asked how we seek the Mother Who loves us. As for me, I follow the Sushuric path– the path of Love. I imagine (perhaps this is not the correct word, I beg your indulgence as I explain) our dear Mother and all Her love. And all the while I know that She is so much more than I could ever imagine. But I begin there, and as in the scriptures, sometimes I imagine approaching Her and asking to take refuge under Her mantle. She opens Her beautiful mantle/cloak/robe to me, and wraps Her arms around me, enfolding me in love and warmth and safety. And then I feel and think about the Love that She has for me, to care for me so, and the love I have for Her in return.

    Sometimes She will show me a little glimpse of Herself when I am reading the scriptures, or when I see a beautiful sunrise, or marvel at all the sparkling stars in the sky. Sometimes it is when I watch a kinnie of baby animals and their sweet mothers. And sometimes when I am having trouble feeling that Dea loves me, I will imagine throwing myself at Her feet and pouring out all my troubles and worries. And then She will gather me up in Her mantle again and I will feel better.

    I also see Dea in the love and amity that we share here, and that I have with my dearest friends. I see it in the kind and helpful things that people (even Tellurians!) do for each other. I see it in beautiful art and enchanting music. I see it in meals prepared with love and care.

    It is just my poor little way, to look at all love as echoes of our Mother’s Love. (There is a verse that says all music is but the echo of the one perfect Music, and so on, and I do not remember if it references Love, but for me I believe it applies to Love.) And through this love and Love I find Dea.

  • #1437124
    Profile photo of Clare Trent
    Clare Trent
    Participant

    Rayati minasan, and especially Miss Cordelia,
    Please excuse me that I don’t visit here very often — indeed I may never have welcomed you personally, for which, if that is the cae, I offer my sincere apologies — but I have been reading this interesting thread in the evening summaries that arrive in my inbox.

    Sanae-chei has given you her beautiful and loving thoughts about how she approaches knowing we have a Mother Who loves us. I noticed she used the word, “scriptures” — and, please forgive me if I offer here information you already know, I thought you might think she was referring to the Christian scriptures. Of course, these are very meaningful and profound to many souls who worship God differently, and not as a Mother.

    In fact, Sanae-chei is referring to a little book you can get through the website of Sun Daughter Press which is called, “The Gospel of Our Mother God: The Scriptures of the world’s first Faith”. There are some lovely and loving verses therein that help us know our Mother better and give us spiritual succor and guidance in daily life.

    Rayati with warm greetings, Clare Trent

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